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    Minutes of 10-03-2005 Board of Commissioners Meeting (adopted)
WAKE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
October 3, 2005

The Wake County Board of Commissioners met in regular session Monday, October 3, 2005, at 2:00 p.m. in the Commissioners’ Room, 7th Floor, Wake County Courthouse, Raleigh, North Carolina. Members present were Commissioners Kenneth M. Gardner, Tony Gurley, Phil Jeffreys, Betty Lou Ward, Harold H. Webb and Chairman Joe Bryan. Commissioner Herbert H. Council was absent.

Also attending were the County Manager, Mr. David C. Cooke; the County Attorney, Mr. Michael R. Ferrell; and the Clerk to the Board, Ms. Gwendolyn I. Reynolds.

Chairman Bryan called the meeting to order.
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PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

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INVOCATION

Commissioner Ward introduced Rev. Kay Johnson, Minister, Edenton Street United Methodist Church, to offer the invocation.
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APPROVAL OF AGENDA

Upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Webb, the Board unanimously approved the agenda as printed.
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APPROVAL OF MINUTES

Upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Jeffreys, the Board unanimously approved the minutes of September 19, 2005, and September 21, 2005.
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PROCLAMATION
RECOGNIZING OCTOBER 2005 AS
NATIONAL BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH AND
DECLARING THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 2-8, 2005 AS
PINK RIBBON WEEK IN WAKE COUNTY

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Community organizations, faith partners, and work sites play an integral role in educating their members or employees about breast cancer. Ms. Sonja Reed, Public Health Educator, Wake County Human Services, appeared before the Board to request endorsement of a proclamation recognizing October 2005 as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and the week of October 2-8, as Pink Ribbon Week in Wake County. She also presented information about the various activities planned during Pink Ribbon Week and throughout the month of October.

Dr. David Moore, Health Director of Chronic Disease Prevention and Ms. Denise Hicks, Registered Nurse, presented information on new breast cancer detection screening programs.

Following the reading of the proclamation, Commissioner Ward made a motion to endorse the Proclamation recognizing October 2005 as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and that the week of October 2-8, 2005, be declared as Pink Ribbon Week in Wake County. The motion was seconded by Commissioner Gurley and was unanimously approved.
PROCLAMATION
NATIONAL BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH
AND PINK RIBBON WEEK 2005
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UPDATE ON THE FEED IN THE BIN PROGRAM

The Wake County Solid Waste Management Division is partnering with several agencies to provide a high-quality recycling program to the schools, along with a solid waste education unit on a countywide basis. FEED THE BIN is a new school recycling and environmental education program, consisting of two components—operations and environmental education.

Chairman Bryan recognized Mr. Jim Reynolds, Solid Waste Management Director, along with staff members Emily Finney and Kelly Dennings, to present information on the BIN Program. They reported that during the past school year, the program was implemented in 49 schools and staff gave 93 presentations to students and faculty. Each school participating in the program is provided classroom recycling bins and roll carts for the collection of paper and 30-gallon containers for the collection of aluminum cans and plastic bottles. The program relies on students to help with the recycling for a hands-on learning experience. Once the students move the material from classrooms to loading docks, contractors pick it up daily or weekly. During the last year the program consisted of 330,576 pounds of paper recycled, 326,920 pounds of newspaper and 94,000 pounds of aluminum cans and plastic bottles.

Program partnerships include Wake County Public School System, the City of Raleigh, North Carolina Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance and The News and Observer.

Following the viewing of a PowerPoint presentation, the Commissioners received the information on the FEED THE BIN Program as presented.
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VEHICLE VALUATION PRESENTATION

Chairman Bryan recognized Emmett Curl, Revenue Director, to present information about the vehicle valuation process for tax purposes. Questions were raised about the process during the Commissioners’ September 19, 2005 meeting.

Mr. Curl made brief comments and introduced Henry Kinrade, Department of Revenue, to make the presentation. Mr. Kinrade reported that Wake County contracts with a company to furnish a valuation system that checks the vehicle identification number of each vehicle and provides the most accurate value available. The values are determined as of January 1 of each year and remain constant for all vehicles renewed from January through the end of August. All vehicles renewed September through December are valued as of January 1 of the following year. Values are checked against market conditions using numerous pricing guides, including the January NADA, Southeastern Edition, retail column. When values are compared with values used in other counties in the state, they are found to be either the same or five percent plus or minus.

Out of 600,000 vehicles valued annually, approximately 5,000 are adjusted. These adjustments are primarily due to high mileage and/or information not made available when the initial value is assessed. Every effort is made to satisfy any customer inquiry about the valuation; however, the customer is required to furnish documentation to support any adjustment.

Following a question/answer period, the Commissioners received the information as presented.
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DISPOSITION OF SURPLUS PROPERTY KNOWN AS
HOMEMAKERS EXTENSION CLUB PROPERTY IN
PANTHER BRANCH TOWNSHIP

In 1937 Pauline Adams deeded to the County approximately 1.2 acres on John Adams Road in the Willow Spring community. The property consisted of a 1,164 square foot farmhouse for a meeting place to be provided to the Homemakers Extension Club. Current information in the County’s files indicates the property has not been used or maintained since the early 1970’s.

The County has attempted several times to dispose of this property and based on old files, this matter was before the Board a number of times between 1991 and 1999. Many offers were tendered but no transactions were ever completed due to several different reasons. Recently the County received a signed offer from the family of the original owner of this property, offering to buy it back for $4,500. The property’s tax value of $4,364 was recently adjusted by the Tax Assessor’s Office to reflect the fact that the soils will not support a septic system. Also water and sewer are not available to the property. This offer is subject to a 45-day inspection period in which the Buyer may determine the property’s suitability for their purpose.

In accordance with NC General Statutes, the County may receive an offer to purchase County-owned property and advertise it for upset bids. Should the Board propose to accept this offer, the offeror shall be required to deposit five percent of the offer amount with the Clerk, and the County shall publish a notice of the offer. Any person may thereafter raise the offer as stipulated in NC General Statute 160A-269 within ten days of the notice publication. This procedure may be repeated until no further upset bids are received, at which time the Board may accept the final offer and sell the property to the highest bidder.

Upon motion of Commissioner Jeffreys, seconded by Commissioner Webb, the Board unanimously approved 1) that the County Manager be authorized to enter into a contract to sell the property known as Homemakers Extension Club property in Panther Branch Township to the Adams family partners, subject to the requirements of NCGS 160A-269 and terms acceptable to the County Attorney; and 2) the acceptance of the highest offer submitted for the purchase of the 1.2 acre parcel on John Adams Road, Willow Springs, NC, subject to the terms and conditions acceptable to the County Attorney.
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APPROVAL OF TAX REPORT

Upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Gardner, the Board accepted and unanimously approved Tax Committee recommendations, as follows:

1.
Report of Collections – Wake County Only – August 2005
2.
Wake County In-Rem Foreclosure Progress Report – August 2005
3.
Value Adjustments and Special Situations: (Wake County and City of Raleigh)
4.
Consideration of Requests for Adjustments, Rebates and/or Refunds of Penalties: (Wake County Only), (Wake County and Town of Cary), (Wake County and Town of Garner), (Wake County and Town of Holly Springs), (Wake County and Town of Morrisville), (Wake County and City of Raleigh), (Wake County and Town of Wake Forest)
5.
Consideration of Requests for Exemptions – Late Filed Applications: (Wake County Only), (Wake County and City of Raleigh)
6.
Consideration of Refund for Taxes, Interest, and Penalties: (Wake County Only), (Wake County and Town of Cary), (Wake County and Town of Apex), (Wake County and Town of Garner), (Wake County and Town of Holly Springs), (Wake County and City of Raleigh), (Wake County and Town of Wake Forest)
7.
Request for Tax Relief-Late Filed Applications: (Wake County Only), (Wake County and Town of Fuquay-Varina), (Wake County and Town of Garner), (Wake County and Town of Morrisville), (Wake County and City of Raleigh)
8.
Consideration For Release of Penalties and Interest for Wake County Prepared Food and Beverage Taxes: (Wake County Only)
9.
Rebate Details: (Wake County and Town of Apex), (Wake County and Town of Cary), (Wake County and Town of Fuquay-Varina), (Wake County and Town of Garner), (Wake County and Town of Holly Springs), (Wake County and Town of Knightdale), (Wake County and Town of Morrisville), (Wake County and Town of Rolesville), (Wake County and Town of Wake Forest), (Wake County and Town of Wendell), (Wake County and Town of Zebulon)
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PUBLIC COMMENT

The Board of Commissioners desires to hear from the public about the operations and services of Wake County Government. It is for that reason during regular Board meetings a time certain has been scheduled to receive public comments. Chairman Bryan recognized the following:

1. Ms. Amelia Provenzano, 1019 Rt. 519, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania- 84 Lumber (Introduction and announcement that “84 Lumber” plans to build facility in Wake County) 2. Mr. John Speights, PO Box 12743, Raleigh (comments on improved services provided for Veterans in the County, and announced Veterans Day Parade and activities, November 11, at 10:00 a.m. with Chairman Bryan as Grand Marshal)

There being no other persons to appear before the Board, Chairman Bryan declared the public comment portion of the meeting closed.
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Note: Chairman Bryan called for a five-minute recess.
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INCREASE WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS FY 2006
OPERATING BUDGET APPROPRIATION BY AN AMOUNT
NOT TO EXCEED $4,000,000

On September 8, 2005, the Wake County Public School System reported tenth day enrollment of 120,379 students. This represents 6,425 more students than fiscal year 2005 tenth day student enrollment and 1,252 more students than enrollment budgeted for in the fiscal year 2006 budget.

The 20th day enrollment number is due to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction by October 5. If enrollment grows the same or more between the 10th day and 20th day in fiscal year 2006 as the previous year, it is anticipated that the 20th day student enrollment could range from 120,500 to 121,000 students, resulting in an additional appropriation to the Wake County Public School System ranging from $2,800,000 to $4,000,000.

Following comments and upon motion of Commissioner Webb, seconded by Commissioner Gardner, the Board approved increasing the appropriation to the Wake County Public School System by an amount not to exceed $4,000,000 from the General Fund appropriated fund balance to accommodate student enrollment growth that is in addition to the student enrollment growth funded in the adopted fiscal year 2006 budget. Commissioners Bryan, Gardner, Gurley, Ward and Webb voted aye; Commissioner Jeffreys voted nay.

Chairman Bryan recognized Chair Patti Head, Wake County Board of Education, for comments and to express appreciation to the Commissioners for the increased appropriation to keep the Wake County Public School System academically sound.
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PUBLIC HEARING
ON THE CANNADY-BROGDEN FARM
HISTORIC LANDMARK DESIGNATION

Chairman Bryan announced a public hearing to consider the Cannady-Brogden Farm Historic Landmark designation, duly advertised as provided by statute for Monday, October 3, 2005, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 700 of the Wake County Courthouse, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Mr. Dan Roth of Capital Area Preservation, presented an overview of the property which is located off Old Weaver Trail in Sandy Plain, a small community in northwestern Wake County. The house was built in 1904 and is comprised of a corn crib, woodshed, wash house, covered well, chicken coop, stack house, pack house, machinery shed, mule barn, cow shed, tobacco barn (all of frame construction) and a pasture. The property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in April 2001. The landmark designation boundaries include approximately five acres of the twenty-five acre National Register designation and makes up a portion of the original property purchased by S. A. Cannady in 1899. Upon his death in 1950, Cannady sold his farm to tenant farmer Tom Brogden. Today twenty-five acres of the original farm complex remain and are broken into six parcels. Two of these parcels are included in this landmark application. A 2.8-acre parcel contains the main house and all but one of the outbuildings. An adjacent 2.3-acre parcel separated from the farmhouse by Brogden Road, contains the mule barn and an agricultural landscape that continues to contribute to the historic character of the farm complex.

The factual situation having been presented, Chairman Bryan announced that anyone desiring to comment on the designation would be heard at this time.

Ms. Deloris Harmon, 15260 Brogden Road, Creedmoor (youngest daughter of Mr. Tom Brogden) – support designation

No one commented in opposition to the proposed designation.
Chairman Bryan then called for the recommendation of the Wake County Historic Preservation Commission.
Ms. Stephanie Ashworth, representing the Commission, reported that two public hearings have been conducted, May 17, 2004 and August 9, 2005. The application was tabled following the May 19, 2004 hearing due to litigation between the applicant and neighboring property owners concerning road access. These matters have been resolved and following the hearing on August 9, 2005, the Commission recommended to the Board of Commissioners that the property be designated a Wake County Historic Landmark.

Thereafter, at the conclusion of the public hearing, Chairman Bryan declared the hearing closed and invited action by the Board.

Upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Jeffreys, the Board unanimously adopted an ordinance designating the Cannady-Brogden Farm a Historic Landmark.


Section 9. Any violation of this ordinance shall be unlawful as by law provided.
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PUBLIC HEARING
ON THE DR. NATHAN BLALOCK HOUSE
HISTORIC LANDMARK DESIGNATION

Chairman Bryan announced a public hearing to consider the Dr. Nathan Blalock House a Historic Landmark designation, duly advertised as provided by statute for Monday, October 3, 2005, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 700 of the Wake County Courthouse, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Mr. Dan Roth of Capital Area Preservation presented information on the proposed landmark designation. He stated that the Dr. Nathan Blalock House property sits on a one-acre parcel in the vicinity of Willow Springs in southeastern Wake County. The parcel contains a house and three contributing outbuildings: 1910 main house, 1950 smokehouse, 1910 well house and 1910 dollhouse. The house is one of Wake County’s best remaining examples of high-style Classical Revival architecture. The most distinguishing feature of this large, two-story weatherboarded house is its grandiose full-height portico supported by two pairs of fluted columns. The house has ten rooms arranged around a center hall plan. Each room has a unique classically inspired mantelpiece. Original furnishings, medical records, and instruments related to Dr. Blalock’s practice remain in the house. The boundary of the landmark designation is a parcel of approximately one acre immediately surrounding the house and its contributing outbuildings.

The factual situation having been presented, Chairman Bryan announced that anyone desiring to comment on the proposed designation would be heard at this time.

Lynn and Diane Blalock, 6741 Rock Service Station Road, Willow Springs (owners and members of Blalock family) – support application

No one commented in opposition to the proposed designation.

Chairman Bryan then called for the recommendation of the Wake County Historic Preservation Commission.
Ms. Stephanie Ashworth, representing the Commission, reported that the Commission conducted a public hearing August 9, 2005 and recommended that the Board of Commissioners designate the Dr. Nathan Blalock house a Wake County Historic Landmark.

Thereafter, at the conclusion of the public hearing Chairman Bryan declared the hearing closed and called for action by the Board.

Upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Webb, the Board unanimously adopted an ordinance designating the Dr. Nathan Blalock House a Historic Landmark
described property should be designated a historic landmark; and


Section 9. Any violation of this ordinance shall be unlawful as by law provided.
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ADOPTION OF THE WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM
CAPITAL PLANNING ISSUES

Over the past six months, the Wake County Public School System and County staffs as well as the Board of Education and the Board of Commissioners have been working on a document outlining the building assumptions that will guide the School System near-term and future building program. This document is titled “Capital Planning Issues.”

The Issues address the priorities of future School building programs to 1) ensure the health and safety of children and staff, 2) to ensure adequacy of facilities for effective learning, 3) to reduce school overcrowding and 4) to complete phased renovations. These issues include planning principles that will be used to create a project list that will be prioritized and accomplished through multiple building programs. It will also be used to develop the next bond program.

Following comments and upon motion of Commissioner Gurley, seconded by Commissioner Ward, the Board adopted the Capital Planning Issues, the assumptions that will guide the Wake County Public School System’s near-term and future building programs.Commissioners Bryan, Gardner, Gurley, Ward and Webb voted aye; Commissioner Jeffreys voted nay.
CAPITAL PROGRAM PLANNING ISSUES

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to outline the planning principles underlying the goals of the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) long-range capital building program. A committee comprised of WCPSS and Wake County Staff jointly developed the Capital Program Planning issues. This committee collaborated to develop a coordinated strategy for addressing issues related to Wake County's growth and facility needs.

These planning principles will be used to identify and quantify the investment anticipated over the next two decades to construct new schools to accommodate the growing student enrollment, and to ensure that existing schools are safe, quality places for students to learn. The resulting project list will be prioritized and accomplished through multiple building programs. The next bond program, which will be presented to voters in fall 2006, will be based upon a comprehensive capital improvement plan that addresses construction of new schools, renovation of existing schools, and changes to school calendars.

Capital construction program planning will support the attainment of Goal 2008, which states: “WCPSS is committed to academic excellence. By 2008, 95% of students in grades 3 through 12 will be at or above grade level as measured by the State of North Carolina End-of-Grade or Course tests, and all students groups will demonstrate high growth”.

The impact on the health of existing schools will be taken into consideration with any decision regarding capital projects or school calendars. Characteristics of healthy schools include: high academic achievement by all students; strong parental support and commitment; strong community support and commitment; highly trained and effective staff; attractive and appropriate learning facilities; a safe, orderly, and inviting learning climate; strong and effective leadership; and a diverse student body.

Project priorities should:
Overview
The following is an overview of the assumptions needed to address the next phase of the Capital Building program. The joint staff committee established broad assumptions targeting the following key issues

1. High Performance Guidelines
2. Program Magnet Schools
3. Non-traditional School Facilities - Public/Private Partnerships
4. School Grade Configurations
5. Class Size Ratio
6. Renovation of Existing Schools
7. Student Accommodations
8. Education Program
9. Pre-Kindergarten, Ages 3-4
10. Kindergarten Program
11. School Capacity Models
12. New School Size & Space Standard
13. School Site Size
14. Property Acquisition
15. Support Facilities
16. Technology
17. Year Round Calendar Schools
18. Student Enrollment Projection
19. Timeframe
20. Program Price Bases
21. Funding
PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS

1. High Performance Guidelines:

2. Program Magnet Schools:

3. Non-traditional school facilities – Public/Private Partnerships:

a. Mobile and modular classroom structures will continue to be used to accommodate student enrollment;
b. Complete modular school campuses will continue to be utilized as temporary start up schools and as swing space during building renovations;
c. Consideration will be given, on a case-by-case basis, to acquisition of existing buildings that would be suitable for conversion to schools; some traditional program elements might be compromised if such a facility were used.
d. Opportunities for public/private partnerships will be considered, if advantageous to the educational program and if such partnerships are evaluated as cost effective.


4. School Grade Configurations:

a. Current grade configurations of K-5, 6-8 and 9-12 will be retained;
b. Other grade configurations may be considered, based upon educational suitability, space needs, and cost analysis.


5. Class Size Ratio:
* Reflects average usage
Grade Level
Class Size Requirements
(Grade Span Average)
K-3
21
4-8
26
9-12
24 * (State Maximum = 29)
Special Needs – Self-Contained
9 * (Range of 4 to 16)
Pre-K
10 *
6. Renovation of Existing Schools:

a. The target of eliminating the backlog of deferred major renovation projects and deferred life cycle replacement projects will be attained by 2012 (5 years from the start of the next building program).
b. Existing school requirements will be included in one of the following categories: c. Major renovation projects will be based on renovating 1/40th of the total system-wide square footage each year;
d. Major renovation projects (both deferred and cyclical) will be listed as separate line items on the prioritized project list; life cycle replacement projects will be summarized as a line item, with detail projects listed on back-up documentation. Project status will be reported in the annual “School Building Program Report to Stakeholders.”
e. The school models, amenities and finishes (walls, floors, etc.) in renovated schools will be of same standard as new schools;
f. Spaces in existing schools will be considered adequate if the size is not less than 75% of the approved space standards;
g. Renovation costs exceeding 75% of new construction will trigger a life-cycle cost analysis of renovation vs. replacement;
h. WCPSS will assess by 2010 the total system-wide square footage. After 2010, WCPSS will assess 1/7 of the total system-wide square footage each year. WCPSS and Wake County will enter into an inter-local agreement for the purpose of developing facility and maintenance standards for all classifications of buildings and develop benchmark comparisons for annual budgets for facilities maintenance.
i. Whole-building major renovation projects will be prioritized using the facility condition index (FCI) with an emphasis on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), health and safety, and infrastructure preservation. Life-cycle replacements will be prioritized using the priority matrix that focuses on health, safety and immediate needs.
j. Existing sites will be reviewed to determine ability to add seats.
k. Major renovation projects will include funding for replacement of furniture, equipment, and technology if required.

7. Student Accommodations:

a.The goal is for no more than 8% of students to be in mobile/modular units, including modular schools; this does not include units provided as swing-space for renovation projects. This target will be attained by 2012 (5 years from the start of the next building program).
b. Long range capital planning will be based on a target of 95% utilization of permanent elementary and middle school seats, 97.5% utilization of permanent high school seats, and 100% of mobile and modular spaces. This allows for a 2 % to 5% student management factor for flexibility in student assignment and classroom utilization, in recognition of the facts that: a) any given school’s enrollment may increase during the school year; and b) it is not reasonable to achieve a one-to-one ratio (100% utilization) of students to available seats in a school, at a grade level, or in a classroom. Utilization targets will reached by 2015.

8. Educational Program:

Children with specific needs will continue to be served in accordance with federal and state requirements. School models will include spaces to accommodate these requirements. Specific statutory references are listed below:

a. Students with Disabilities:

Disability law requires the provision of special education and related/special needs services to students with disabilities, ages 3 through 21. It is inclusive of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Americans with Disability Act, (ADA), and the NC Procedures Governing Programs and Services for Children with Disabilities.

Elementary (std): 3 Self-contained classrooms @ 9 students average; 2 Resource Classrooms (pull out)
Middle: 5 Separate Services classrooms @ 9 students average; 5 Resource Classrooms (pull out)
High: 2 Separate Services classrooms @ 9 students average; 7 Resource Classrooms @ 12 students average; 3 Occupational Course of Study @ 12 students average.

b. General Education Support:

General Education classrooms serve the general population that is identified with special needs. These students are housed in regular classrooms and “pulled out” for special services.
c. Some parts of the county may have a higher proportion of special needs children and programs than others. Additional classroom spaces may be considered for some schools in order for special needs students to remain in close proximity to their residence – a requirement of federal law.

9. Pre-kindergarten, Ages 3 & 4:


10. Kindergarten Program:

Full-day kindergarten will continue to be offered.


11. School Capacity Models:


12. New School Size and Space Standards:

a. School infrastructure, cafeteria, media center and other core spaces will be designed to accommodate the number of students in permanent buildings, plus optimum number of mobile/modular units, as defined in capacity models;
b. The current capacity models for WCPSS are based upon research on school size, and support the personalization of teaching and learning, rigorous instructional program and community expectations.

School model sizes are:
Model
DPI Capacity Guidelines
Building Capacity: Traditional Calendar
Capacity with 4 or 6 mobile Classrooms (a&b)
Building Capacity: Year-Round Conversion (c)
Space Standards (Square Feet)Space Std. (d)
Elementary (std.)
400
655
747
843
86,880
Elementary (lg.)
700
800
892
1,124
102,970
Middle
600-800
981
1,137
1,293
159,752
High
800-1200
1,663
1,807
Note (e)
261,744

(a) “4 or 6” mobiles: 4 for elementary; 6 for secondary;
(b) Includes Special Needs teaching spaces; Elementary standard: 8; elementary large: 12; middle: 12; high: 14;
(c) Elementary (std.): 2 single & 2 double loaded tracks with 3 mobiles; Elementary (lg.): All 4 double loaded tracks with 3 mobiles; Middle: All single loaded tracks with 1 mobile.
(d) Actual prototypes may vary depending on code requirements. Elementary square footage reflects a 1-story design.
(e) A multi-track schedule for high school is not recommended from an educational program and cost analysis perspective. A year-round capacity of 2,491 requires redesign to construct 10 “special” teaching spaces (art, band, CTE, etc.) and use of 10 mobile classrooms. Conversion of an existing high school would require renovations of approximately 20 classrooms to create 10 “special” teaching spaces and use of 20 mobile classrooms.

13. School Site Size:

a. The size of new school sites is based upon the educational program needs, the environmental/regulatory requirements of the jurisdictions in which they are located and configuration/topography of the site (refer to table below);

b. New school sites will be evaluated with Wake County and municipalities to determine the feasibility of joint development;

c. Land held by WCPSS will be the minimum practical number of acres needed for educational program and regulatory requirements;

d. The requirements of environmental and local ordinances will be met;

e. Continue the practice of building multistory middle and high schools. Elementary school height will be evaluated based on the cost of land versus the cost of multiple story construction. Elementary schools will be two stories, unless an analysis of construction cost versus land cost indicates single story is more economical.
f. For capital planning purposes, property acquisition will be based on average acreage requirement of 19 acres for elementary, 31 acres for middle, and 65 acres for high.



School Type
Acres required for current Standard Program
Average acres required for compliance with environmental regulations and local ordinances
Elementary
10
9
Middle
17
14
High
37
28



g. NC Department of Public Instruction guidelines are as follows:
Grades
Developable Acreage
Applied to WCPSS Standard School Sizes
K-6
10 + (1/100 ADM)
10 + (655/100)=16.55
5-8
15 + (1/100ADM)
15 + (981/100) = 24.81
7-9
20 + (1/100 ADM)
N/A
9-12
30 + (1/100 ADM) + (10 acres for stadium and parking)
30 + (1,663/100) + 10 = 56.63


14. Property Acquisition:

a. WCPSS will actively work with municipalities to create a multi-jurisdiction coordinated study to establish standards for land-banking;
b. Sites will be sought for land-banking five years in advance of the construction start dates;
c. Location and schedule of new schools will be guided by current crowding, projected growth,
and increasing student assignment stability; new schools may also provide temporary swing
space for renovations of schools in the area;
d. Due to the dynamic growth in real estate prices and the varying prices in different parts of the county, the trends in land cost data will be used for escalation of future prices;
e. Off-site utility and road construction will be budgeted as a separate line item;
f. The cost of off-site infrastructure and projected site development costs will be included in analyzing candidate school sites;
g. School sites are currently allowed in watersheds zoned R-40W. The additional siting and development of school sites within designated watershed areas will require significant policy discussion and potential legislative action. WCPSS, Wake County, municipalities, and stakeholders will be convened to discuss all relevant policy implications;
h. Note: The ownership of land remains an outstanding policy issue yet to be resolved.


15. Support Facilities:

a. Projects for essential health and safety items in existing facilities will be listed as prioritized needs;
b. Enrollment growth as well as needs caused by normal usage and wear may require renovation and expansion of existing support facilities and construction of new facilities such as: satellite transportation centers; infrastructure upgrades or replacement of administrative buildings; and regional shops for maintenance personnel.


16. Technology:

a. Meeting the basic technology requirements in schools enables effective delivery of instruction as specified in the WCPSS Technology Plan and in alignment with the state technology plan;
b. the educational resources enabled by the technology infrastructure are effectively utilized in instructional delivery only with functional, capable computers;
c. School computer needs will be based on five computers per classroom, one per teacher and administrator;
d. A five-year replacement cycle will be included.


17. Year-Round Calendar Schools:

a. Additional year-round schools will be established in order to reduce the number of new schools to be constructed;
b. Consideration will be given to opening Brier Creek and Barwell Road elementary schools on a year-round calendar in 2006, and to opening future elementary and middle schools on the year-round calendar;
c. Future consideration will be given to the addition of single-track year-round calendar high schools that would support the multi-track year-round K-8 schedules.
d. Criteria for conversion will include over-crowding of existing schools, projected enrollment growth, health of converted school and impacted schools, the number of mobile/modular units, and other factors;
e. The number of schools to be established on a year-round calendar will be determined as part of a comprehensive facilities plan that addresses construction of new schools and renovation of existing schools, as well as the number of year-round schools.


18. Student Enrollment Projection:

a. Wake County Planning Department will annually generate WCPSS 20th day student membership projections, using the projection model retooled by Informed Decisions Inc. in February 2005. The projections generated in November 2005 will be based on the 20th day membership data verified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction.
b. Wake County enrollment projections include a statistical range of +/-1% for the first five years, +/-1.5% for the next five years, and +/-2% beyond. The high-end projections will be used in calculating long-range student enrollment.
c. An annual review of the projections versus actual enrollment will identify any seating shortfall or surplus.

19. Time Frame:

Capital planning needs will be projected 20 years out, through 2025.

20. Program Price Bases:

a. Estimates for new schools and renovations are based on actual costs of PLAN 2004 projects bid in 2005;
b. Costs are based on Board of Education approved space standards and existing prototype designs and include: construction cost, on-site development, demolition, design, materials testing, surveying, hazardous materials abatement (if any), moving costs, interim housing, furniture, custodial equipment, media center equipment and books, educational equipment and technology infrastructure;
c. Land purchases are budgeted separately from construction project cost, and acquisition budget is based on the cost trend of PLAN 2004 purchases;
d. Off-site development costs will be listed in a separate line item and will be based on the actual costs of off-site development in PLAN 2004;
e. The cost of annual building assessments will be budgeted as a separate line item;
f. Renovation projects will have a 10% contingency; new school projects will have a 5% contingency
g. Project costs will be adjusted by 5% per year, through 2010, and 3.5% beyond that with an annual reassessment of actual costs;
h. The building program will have a 2% contingency, budgeted separately. This contingency is included to provide funding of emergency projects; or to provide funding in the event critical assumptions (class size, school site size, cost of property acquisition, enrollment projections, etc.) differ substantially from actual experience. The Board of Education will review such critical needs and, if appropriate, request that the Board of Commissioners reallocate funds.
i. Program management budget will be 3.5%.

21. Funding

a. The building program will be funded through a variety of funding options to potentially include general obligations bonds, pay-as-you-go funds, state and federal funding.
b. Pay as you go funds should be targeted to the non-capitalized technology and equipment.
c. Alternate means of funding capital construction such as the lease of privately constructed school facilities and the potential for public-private partnerships for the construction of new schools will be considered.

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PARTNERSHIP WITH THE CITY OF RALEIGH FOR
PROPERTY ACQUISITION ALONG THE NEUSE RIVER
OPEN SPACE CORRIDORS

In 1996, the Raleigh City Council adopted the Neuse River Corridor Master Recreation Plan. The Plan covered the 16-mile segment of the Neuse River from Falls Lake Dam to Poole Road that was within or soon to be within the City’s jurisdictional boundaries. The Vision of the Plan encouraged the protection of the entire 100-year flood plain of the Neuse River and acquisition of adjoining non-flood plain lands along the corridor to provide for nodal or gateway parks connecting to the trail for access and expanded recreation opportunities.

In August 2001, the Board of Commissioners adopted Phase I of the Wake County Open Space Plan, which included the acquisition of conservation/greenway easements on the 100-year flood plain on both sides of the Neuse River from Poole Road to the Johnston County line. The corridor includes approximately 525 acres in Wake County’s jurisdiction, 120 acres in City of Raleigh’s jurisdiction and 260 acres currently owned by the City associated with their wastewater treatment operation.

The City of Raleigh has submitted a proposal to assist the County with the continuation of open space acquisitions along the Neuse River Corridor from Poole Road south to Johnston County. This proposal would include City staff assuming all administrative responsibilities (no cost to the County) for negotiating the acquisition of conservation land rights, including all due diligence work and closing of the transactions. The County would provide funding for acquisition costs, including purchase price, surveys, appraisals, and environmental; assessments and closing costs. It is estimated that there are 107 affected parcels with an approximate flood plan acreage of 645 acres. The estimated cost to acquire the easements on this 645 acres including surveys and appraisals is $4.2 million.

The City will negotiate the contracts for purchase on behalf of the County with the contract being between the County and the property owner. Each contract will be presented to the Board of Commissioners for approval and execution and the property will be acquired in the name of Wake County.

Mr. Jack Duncan, City of Raleigh Parks and Recreation, was present at today’s meeting and assisted with presenting information on the Comprehensive Plan.

Upon motion of Commissioner Webb, seconded by Commissioner Jeffreys, the Board unanimously approved an Interlocal Agreement with the City of Raleigh for property rights acquisition along the Neuse River Open Space Corridor, subject to terms and conditions acceptable to the County Attorney.
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ACQUISITION OF OPEN SPACE PROPERTY IN THE LITTLE RIVER
AND SWIFT CREEK OPEN SPACE CORRIDORS

The Little River and Swift Creek Open Space Corridors are two of the nine corridors approved by the Board of Commissioners in conjunction with the County’s Open Space Preservation Program. The approval of these corridors included the proposed acquisition of the 100 year flood plain or 300 feet on either side of the Little River which ever is greater and 300 feet on either side of Swift Creek.

Little River Open Space Corridor: the L. E. Mitchell farm is located on Mitchell Town Road in the Little River Open Space Corridor. The farm’s western boundary is the Little River just south of the Franklin County line. The portion of the farm within Wake County consists of 45 acres. The area within the Little River Corridor is approximately 20 acres consisting of flood plain and on-flood plain property. In order to acquire 300 feet off the bank of Little River, it is necessary to extend the purchase limits beyond the flood plain. The remaining 25 acres are wooded or in agricultural production. The Mitchell property is contiguous and to the north of the 94 acre Barham Farm property on which the County acquired an agricultural conservation easement in 2003.

In December 1989, Mr. Mitchell deeded the farm to a son and two daughters subject to a life estate reserved for himself and his wife. All of these parties have agreed to the proposed sale at a price of $9,200 per acre. The Mitchell children have indicated that they wish all the proceeds from the sale of this property to go directly to their parents, Mr. L. E. Mitchell and Mrs. Mitchell.

Swift Creek Open Space Corridor: A portion of the Brookwood Subdivision is located within the Swift Creek Open Space Corridor and was developed in the late 1960’s. The owners of Lots 4, 33, and 34 in Brookwood Subdivision have agreed to sell the lots for $4,000 per acre. The lots front on the right of way of Meadowlane Drive. All three lots are located within the Swift Creek flood plan. It is anticipate that Lot 4 will be used as a potential exchange property for acquisition of Swift Creek Corridor acreage from an adjoining owner.

Upon motion of Commissioner Jeffreys, seconded by Commissioner Webb, the Board unanimously approved the following: 1) the purchase of approximately 20 acres from the L. E. Mitchell family for $9,200 per acre; 2) the purchase of Lot 4, Brookwood Subdivision from Jerry Gower Construction for $1,840 and the purchase of Lots 33 and 34 from RHC Construction for $9,720; and 3) the County Manager be authorized to execute contracts for the purchase of these properties subject to terms and conditions acceptable to the County Attorney.
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INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT WITH THE
BOARD OF EDUCATION AND TOWN OF ZEBULON
FOR COMMUNITY USE PARK FACILITIES AT WAKELON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Earlier this year, the Board of Education purchased approximately 35 acres in Zebulon at a price of $529,000 for the planned Wakelon Elementary School. Of these 35 acres, ten were donated to the Wake County Public School System by the Town and developer of the adjacent residential community. The School System, County and Town propose to jointly develop recreational improvements on the property for use by the community.

In fiscal year 2004-05 the Capital Improvement Program allocated $250,000 in funding for the infrastructure, design and construction of park improvements at Wakelon Elementary School. The Town of Zebulon is contributing $150,000 toward development of the project. All improvements will be maintained entirely by the Town similar to other park facilities already in their system.

A draft interlocal agreement has been prepared by all three governing boards outlining the terms and conditions relating to funding development of the planned community use facilities. A joint use agreement will be prepared and executed prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy for the community use facilities.

Chairman Bryan recognized Mayor Bob Matheny of the Town of Zebulon, and Bruce Herbert of McGregor Development Corporation, who contributed ten acres to the development of this project.

Upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Gurley, the Board unanimously authorized the execution of an interlocal agreement between Wake County, Board of Education and Town of Zebulon for the development of community use park facilities at Wakelon Elementary School with the County contribution from the Community School element of the Capital Plan not to exceed $250,000; a joint use agreement is being executed prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy for the community park facilities; and both agreements shall be subject to terms and conditions acceptable to the County Attorney.

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
    COUNTY OF WAKE
    INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT OF PARK FACILITIES WAKELON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    TAX ID# 0030092

    THIS AGREEMENT made and entered into this the ___ day of _______, 2005, by and between the Town of Zebulon ("the Town"), Wake County Board of Education (“the Board”) and the County of Wake, North Carolina (“the County”).
    WITNESSETH:
    WHEREAS, the Board has acquired fee simple title to approximately 34.72 acres of land located on Pippin Road near the intersection of Pippin Road and Zebulon Highway, Zebulon, NC which is the proposed site of the new Wakelon Elementary and identified at Wake County PIN #1796.02 67 9310 (“the property”), and
    WHEREAS, the County and Town desire to contribute funding for recreational improvements not included in the standard elementary school program, and WHEREAS, the Town, the Board and the County desire to enter into an agreement to set forth certain terms and conditions relating to the design, construction, operation, maintenance and ownership of public recreational facilities on the property, and
    WHEREAS, this Agreement is entered into pursuant to North Carolina General Statutes, Article 20, Part1 of Chapter 160A.
    NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual goals and promises contained herein, and the mutual benefits to result therefrom, the parties agree as follows:

    1. The Town, the Board and County shall jointly plan for the development of recreational facilities on the property as shown on the attached Exhibit A. It is
    agreed that the Board shall prepare the master plan for the project to include the following additional improvements to be funded by the Town and County:

    2. The Board shall be responsible for the design and construction for the recreational improvements as shown on Exhibit A, including those additional
    improvements to be funded by the County and Town as referenced in Section 1. The County and Town shall be responsible for the additional design costs
    associated with the recreational improvements to be funded by the County and Town. These additional design costs shall be negotiated and approved by the
    County and Town prior to commencement of project design.

    3. The County shall contribute $ 250,000 towards the design and construction costs for the improvements on the property as referenced in Section 1 in
    accordance with the approved Master Plan as shown on the attached Exhibit A.

    4. The Town shall contribute $150,000 towards the design and construction costs for the recreational improvements on the property as referenced in
    Section 1 in accordance with the approved Master Plan as shown on the attached Exhibit A.

    5. The recreational improvements listed in Section 1 shall be bid with breakout pricing by the Board as a part of the contract for school construction. Upon
    receipt of bids, the County and Town shall review the prices received for the recreational improvements. Based upon the availability of funding and bids
    received, the County and Town shall promptly notify the Board regarding the acceptance of the recreational improvement bids.

    6. The Town and the Board agree to enter into a Joint Use Agreement supplementing this Agreement which will provide for shared use of specified portions of the Project and set forth the terms and conditions associated with the use, operation and maintenance of the recreational improvements for a period of twenty-five (25) years from the date of execution of the agreement. At the end of the initial term the County and Town shall have the exclusive option to extend the Town’s use for up to an additional 25-year period so long as the property is not needed for Board purposes and the facility is operated as a school. A Joint Use Agreement shall be executed by all Parties on or before the date of issuance of a certificate of compliance (and a certificate of occupancy, if applicable) for the project by the governmental entity having regulatory jurisdiction. 7. The Board shall exercise its best efforts to avoid the displacement of or damage to County or Town funded recreational improvements located on Board
    property. Should it become necessary for the Board to locate temporarily mobile classroom units or a similar temporary use for a period of less than 5 years
    on recreational fields or parking areas upon which the County and Town funded improvements, the Board agrees that, upon ceasing the use of the property
    and removal of the mobile units, all improvements will be restored at the Board’s expense to their condition prior to the use of the property. Any use of the
    property by the Board which prohibits the use of the County or Town funded improvements by the community for a continuous period of more than 5 years,
    shall terminate the County’s and Town’s use of the facilities and shall require that the Board pay the County the depreciated value of said improvements. The
    depreciation shall be calculated as a straight line depreciation for a 25-year period commencing with the date of this Agreement and the depreciation
    calculation shall be based on the depreciated value of the facilities at the time the Board initiated it’s continuous use of the facilities. (i.e. if the Board’s
    continuous use of the facilities exceeds 5 years in year 8 after the date of the Agreement, the Board shall pay the depreciated value of the facilities from year 3
    to year 25). Upon determination that the Board’s use has exceeded a continuous 5 year period, the actual amount due the County for depreciation will be
    promptly calculated. Payment to the County by the Board for depreciation shall be made within 90 days after said determination. The County shall then
    reimburse the Town a prorata share of these proceeds based upon the Town’s contribution to the cost of said improvements. Neither the County nor the
    Town is entitled to any compensation for any temporary use by the Board beyond the 25-year period commencing with the date of this Agreement.

    8. The term of this Interlocal Agreement shall commence upon execution by all parties hereto and shall conclude twenty five (25) years from execution of this
    Agreement, or upon expiration of any subsequent Joint Use Agreement authorizing Board and County to use some or all of the Project’s improvements and
    recreational areas, unless sooner terminated in accordance with this agreement or subsequent modification hereto.

    9. The Board shall own the land and the school improvements located on the Board’s property except as provided in any subsequent amendment to this
    agreement. The execution of this Agreement or a Joint Use Agreement shall not affect the Board’s authority to sell or convey fee simple title to it’s underlying
    property. Should the property of the Board be sold on which improvements have been made by the County and Town, the Board shall reimburse the County
    the depreciated value of recreational improvements made to the property by the County and Town (Straight-line depreciation for a 25 year period
    commencing with the date of this Agreement). The County shall then reimburse the Town a prorata share of these proceeds based upon the Town’s
    contribution to the cost of said improvements.

    10. This Agreement may be amended by written agreement consented to by all parties. This Agreement and any Joint Use Agreement shall terminate upon a sale or transfer of the property by the Board. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Boards of the respective Parties have approved this agreement and have caused it to be signed by the Chairman of each Board and attested to by the Secretary or Clerk of that Board, the year and day first written above.

    Attest: _____________________________
    Secretary



    [SEAL]
    Wake County Board of Education

    By: _____________________________

    ________________________Chair
    Attest: _____________________________
    Clerk


    [SEAL]
    Town of Zebulon

    By: _____________________________

    ______________________, Mayor
    Attest: ______________________________
    Clerk

    [SEAL]
    Wake County Board of Commissioners

    By: __________________________________
    Joe Bryan, Chairman
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    DISCUSSION OF SOUTH WAKE LANDFILL

    At the September 12, 2005 work session, the Board of Commissioners received an update on the work of the Managers’ Solid Waste Committee and staff concerning the South Wake Landfill. Commissioner Jeffreys has requested that this issue be discussed, including consideration of a vote, at today’s meeting.

    Commissioner Jeffreys led the discussion and asked County Manager David Cooke to report on information to date. Mr. Cooke stated that the Managers’ Committee has recommended the construction and operation of the South Wake Landfill (Option C), and according to the established process, the interlocal agreements are being finalized and the various Managers are now taking the matter up with their respective elective governing boards before the final vote by the Wake County Commissioners. He noted that Wake Forest has already voted in support of the Managers’ recommended option and it has been scheduled for consideration by a number of other municipalities.

    Information was sent to the Commissioners this past Friday responding to the questions that have been raised and the evaluation of alternative uses of the property. The County Manager also reported that he had not received any proposals regarding alternative development of the site; however, he did hear from the American Land Fund late Friday afternoon.

    Commissioner Gardner commented on the process in place and the information received on revised assumptions sent to the Board on Friday. He indicated that many of the questions have still not been answered, stated again the following six questions/issues, and requested that they be addressed and incorporated into the assumptions/comparisons for the benefit of the entire Board before making a decision:

    a. If 100 out of the 432 acres were used for something other than a landfill, what would be the projected property value over a 25-year period?
    b. Has any consideration been assumed for potential use of the remaining 332 acres (there have been suggestions), and some value that can be assessed?
    c. Sales tax issue - whether any new dollars will be generated from people who live outside of Wake County and growth over the 25-year period, given the location
    d. Surrounding land values – the impact and difference between living in close proximity to a landfill and in close proximity to some other amenities or services
    e. Job impact on this region (for some use other than a landfill)
    f. Long-term impact of alternative uses (25 years chosen for landfill)

    There was much discussion about the Board of Commissioners and municipal boards being provided complete and sufficient information to make a decision and adhering to the formal approval process—that the Managers’ recommendation be considered by the municipalities before a vote by the Board of Commissioners.

    Commissioner Jeffreys moved that in order to resolve this issue, that the municipalities be urged to move forward with their decisions, that October 28th be set as the deadline to have that information back from the municipalities, and that the Board of Commissioners schedule its vote the first meeting in November. Commissioner Ward seconded the motion.

    Following further discussion, the motion and second were withdrawn.

    The Chairman then requested that staff provide the information as outlined above, and stated that the process would remain open-ended without a date certain for the municipalities to take action.
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    APPOINTMENTS TO ADVISORY BOARDS

    Following nominations and upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Jeffreys, the Board unanimously approved the following appointments:

    a. Wake County Fire Commission

    Chief Mike Cooper (primary, north region) – term expiring 10-31-97
    Chief Chris Wilson (north region, alternate) – term expiring 10-31-07
    Mr. Billy Myrick (citizen/consumer) – term expiring 10-31-07
    (nominated by Commissioner Ward)

    b. Wake County Human Services Board

    Dr. Dianne Dunning – term expiring 11-14-06
    Mr. Richard G. Greb – term expiring 11-14-08
    (nominated by Commissioner Gurley)
    c. Wake County Juvenile Crime Prevention Council

    Sergeant Alan Bumgardner – term expires 1-31-08
    Ms. Alexandria McPherson – term expires 1-31-08
    (nominated by Commissioner Webb)
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    COMMITTEE REPORTS

    Commissioners Gurley and Ward, who serve as co-chairs of the Wake County Volunteer Day Celebration, commented on the event to be held Sunday, October 9, 2005, from 3:00 to 7:00 p.m. at Five County Stadium. The celebration is a way of saying thank you to our volunteers for their many hours of service to Wake County.
    ******************
    OTHER BUSINESS

    Chairman Bryan announced that performance evaluations of the County Manager, County Attorney and the Clerk to the Board have been scheduled for the next meeting, October 17, 2005.
    ******************

    CLOSED SESSION

    Commissioner Ward moved that the Board go into closed session to instruct staff regarding the terms and conditions of contract to purchase approximately 63.8 acres of land for the Little River Reservoir Project from Jimmy and Sonny Perry. The motion was seconded by Commissioner Gurley and was unanimously approved.

    Following the business in closed session, Chairman Bryan called the meeting back into regular session.
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    LITTLE RIVER RESERVOIR PROJECT
    ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY

    Upon motion of Commissioner Ward, seconded by Commissioner Gurley, the Board approved a revision to the motion approved on June 20, 2005, for the purchase of approximately 63.85 acres of land for the Little River Reservoir Project from Jimmy W. Perry and Sonny M. Perry, from a purchase price of $400,000 to a purchase price not-to-exceed $403,500.
    ********************
    There being no further business to come before the Board, Chairman Bryan adjourned the meeting at 5:20 p.m. upon motion of Commissioner Gurley, seconded by Commissioner Webb, and the unanimous vote of the Board.
    ********************
    Gwen Reynolds
    Clerk to the Board